Young people in London are facing more, and wider ranging, challenges then ever before. From a housing crisis, unemployment, to basic wellbeing and safety – often it is young Londoners who face some of the worst outcomes in the population.
We have created a small collection of data that demonstrates the needs of young Londoners, which drives the Vision for Young Londoners.
Health
  • Only 53% of London’s five year olds reach a good level of development at this age.
  • Almost 25% of children in reception, and more than 33% of children in Year 6 are overweight or obese.
  • Just 55% of London’s children are physically active.
  • An average of 67 children starts smoking everyday in London.
  • In 2011-13 pregnancy rates of under-18s totalled 10,356, 25.5 rate per 1000, with 62% of those having abortions in 2011.
  • In 2011-13 pregnancy rates of under-16s totalled 1,945, 4.8 rate per 1000, with 69% leading to abortions.
  • In 2012, 31% of London school pupils aged 11 to 15 years had drunk alcohol, and the weekly amount consumed by young people in the capital was 9.4 units a week.
  • In 2009/10 there were 2,286 alcohol-related calls-outs involving under 18 year olds for three ambulance services in London.
  • On average the mean number of teeth, missing decayed or filled in 5 year-olds in London was 1.66, above the average 1.47 in England.

Mental Health
  • Supporting the parents of children with conduct disorder – such as attention deficit disorder saves 8 pounds for every 1 pound spent  (The Cavendish Square Group Fact Book – NHS)
  • One in 10 young people in London may have a clinically significant mental health problem – just one in four of these will receive effective mental health care (The Cavendish Square Group Fact Book – NHS)
  • Other mental health problems include attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, affecting around two to four per cent of teenagers. (Key Data on Adolescence 2015 – AYPH)
  • There are currently 1.1 million people in London who have a common mental disorder between the ages of 5 and 16, which indicates that approximately 111,000 children in the capital have a common mental disorder. Rates are significantly worse amongst looked after children. (The Cavendish Square Group Fact Book – NHS)
Employment
  • The unemployment ratio for 16 to 24-year-olds in London, at 10.7%, is 2.5 times higher than for adults aged 25 to 64; but the gap with young adults in the rest of England has closed. Young adult unemployment ratios started rising in the early to mid-2000s, well before the recession. (London poverty profile 2015– Trust for London)
  • Unemployment in London is two and a half times higher for 16 to 24-year-olds than it is for those aged 25 to 64. (London poverty profile 2015– Trust for London)
  • In the 1990s, the 16 to 24-year-old unemployment ratio was almost two percentage points higher on average in London (in 1995 it was 13.7% compared with 10.7%). (London poverty profile 2015– Trust for London)
  • The proportion measured as not in education, training or employment (NEET) was highest in Inner London at 4%, compared with 2% in Outer London and England as a whole. (London poverty profile 2015– Trust for London)
  • An additional 10% of school leavers in England did not sustain their destination, slightly higher than the proportion in Inner London (8%) and Outer London (7%). (London poverty profile 2015– Trust for London)
  • Strikingly, the unemployment ratios for 16 to 24-year-olds started increasing well before the recession in 2008, whereas the impact for those aged 25 to 64 was much smaller in both London and the rest of England. In London in 2007, before the recession, the unemployment ratio for 16 to 24-year-olds was already at 11%, 1.7 percentage points higher than the 2002 low point. The ratio then rose a further 2.9 percentage points to its 2013 peak. (London poverty profile 2015– Trust for London)
  • Though not shown as its own category in Figure 10.7, London has a lower proportion of pupils going on to apprenticeships than the England average of 5%. (London poverty profile 2015– Trust for London)
Housing
  • The average rent in London is £1,543 per month, but the UK average rent when London is excluded is £764 per month – nearly half. (HomLet rental index – HomeLet)
  • 391,000 children (24 per cent) in London are overcrowded – an 18 per cent rise since 2008. The biggest rise is in the social rented sector, where 43 per cent of children are overcrowded. (1 in 4 London children overcrowded – Shelter)
  • 81% of English parents are worried about rising house prices and the impact of both on the next generation, while 52% believe it is unlikely their youngsters will have the chance to rent or buy a home in the area where they have grown up.(Poll of 1,475 English parents – YouGov for the National Housing Federation)
  • 15% of households in the capital are low quality, which can cause respiratory problems, cardiovascular disease and accidents in the home. (Cost of Low quality housing – BRE)
  • Most children in poverty are in rented housing (more than 530,000), half with a registered social landlord and half with a private landlord. The number of children in poverty in private rented housing has more than doubled in ten years. (London poverty profile 2015– Trust for London)

Crime
  • In London, 9,542 young people were involved in the youth justice system in 2011-12 and over 20,000 offences were recorded. (Youth Justice Statistics 2012/13 – Youth Justice Board)
  • The total number of young people estimated to be at risk of sexual exploitation across London was 1,002, suggesting that some London boroughs may be under-identifying young people at risk by up to 80%. (Meeting the needs of sexually exploited young people – Barnados)
  • The Metropolitan police have identified a total of 3,495 individual gang members, of 224 known gangs, with 183 gangs linked to more than one offence in the last 12 months, and 58 considered particularly active. (Gangs and serious youth violence – GLA)
  • In 2013/14, 25% of young people aged 16-24 had been a victim of crime at least once in the past year. This is a higher percentage than for all older age groups. (8 facts about young people – ONS)
  • In the year ending March 2015, 29% of young people in the secure estate wereattached to London YOTs. The one London establishment accommodated 14% of the total custodial population.  (Youth Justice Statistics 2014/15 – Youth Justice Board)
  • The Office of the Children’s Commissioner’s 2013 inquiry into child sexual exploitation in gangs and groups found that 2,409 children and young people were subject to sexual exploitation in gangs and a further 16,500 children at risk, using a survey period of August 2010-October 2011. (Gangs and youth crime Thirteenth Report of Session 2014–15, House of Commons Home Affairs Committee)

Education
  • A higher than average proportion of pupils in London went on to higher education, at 55% for Inner London, 57% for Outer London and 48% across England. A lower proportion of pupils from Inner and Outer London went on to training or employment than the average for England (at 2%, 4% and 8% respectively).  (London poverty profile 2015 – Trust for London.
  • A higher proportion of pupils go on to higher education after leaving school in London than the rest of England; 55% from Inner London and 57% from Outer London compared with 48% across England. (London poverty profile 2015 – Trust for London)
  • Pupils receiving free school meals did better at GCSE in every London borough than their peers in the rest of England. In Kensington & Chelsea and Westminster they did better than pupils not receiving free school meals outside London. (London poverty profile 2015 – Trust for London)
  • At 45%, Black pupils had the highest proportion not achieving the target GCSE standard in London, five percentage points higher than White pupils who were the next highest. London pupils did better across all ethnic groups than the rest of England. (London poverty profile 2015 – Trust for London)
  • Over the last decade Inner London has seen a substantial fall in the proportion of 19-year-olds lacking Level 3 qualifications, reaching 38% in 2014. It is now lower than the rest of England (at 44%) and has converged with Outer London (at 35%). (London poverty profile 2015 – Trust for London)

Poverty
  • 55% of children in poverty in London are materially deprived (that is, they lack multiple basic items due to cost) compared with 44% in the rest of England. (London poverty profile 2015– Trust for London)
  • On this measure children in London are more likely to be materially deprived. Overall 32% of children in London are materially deprived compared with 22% in the rest of England. Even among children in poverty, those in London are more likely to be materially deprived at 55% compared with 44% in the rest of England. (London poverty profile 2015– Trust for London)
  • Children in Inner London had the highest poverty rate at 46%, 13 percentage points higher than in Outer London and 20 percentage points higher than in the rest of England. (London poverty profile 2015– Trust for London)
  • In the three years to 2003/04 there were around 600,000 children in poverty in London, which has grown to 680,000 a decade later. Figure 3.4 shows that an underlying shift has occurred among children in poverty, with many more in working families than before (up from 250,000 to 450,000) and fewer in workless families (down from 350,000 to 230,000). (London poverty profile 2015– Trust for London)
  • Low pay rates are higher for younger age groups: around three-quarters of 16 to 20-year-olds and 40% of 21 to 24-year-olds are paid below the London Living Wage. For older age groups, the figure is around 20%. (London poverty profile 2015 – Trust for London)
  • The low pay rate for disabled people with at least A-level education is seven percentage points higher at 24%, and for those with an education below A-level is eight percentage points higher. (London poverty profile 2015– Trust for London)
  • Most children in poverty are in rented housing (over 530,000), half with a registered social landlord and half with a private landlord. The number in the private rented sector has more than doubled in ten years. (London poverty profile 2015 – Trust for London)
  • The number of children in poverty in the private rented sector has more than doubled, reaching a quarter of a million in the three years to 2011/12. (London poverty profile 2015– Trust for London)